Neighbourhood Traffic Management Guide Update

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The City of Oshawa invites community members to provide input on a study to update the Neighbourhood Traffic Management Guide (N.T.M.G.). Traffic management is used to address speeding, volume and traffic safety concerns in neighbourhoods.

The updated N.T.M.G. will identify new processes for selecting the most appropriate management tools for residential streets in the City of Oshawa based on best practices from comparable cities and discuss the roles and justifications for using specific tools. The N.T.M.G. does not address traffic concerns on regional roads in Oshawa.

Have Your Say

Community members are invited to provide their feedback online by:

  • Visiting Connect Oshawa to view a virtual presentation and complete an online feedback form.
  • Community members who prefer to complete the feedback form on paper are asked to call Service Oshawa at 905-436-3311 during regular business hours.
  • Participants can also take part in a crowdsourcing map on Connect Oshawa, which will be used to collect location-specific information on traffic calming issues and concerns on City residential streets.

Key items being considered for inclusion in the updated N.T.M.G. are as follows:

  • a new process for reviewing and implementing Traffic Management in residential neighbourhoods;
  • a policy to determine where in the City Traffic Management should be prioritized;
  • best practices for designing safe roadways in new neighbourhoods;
  • a toolbox of traffic calming measures that can be utilized to improve traffic safety; and,
  • a policy for 40 km/h areas, and Community Safety Zones.

Feedback will be received until 4:00 p.m. on Friday, December 11, 2020 and will be considered in the development of preliminary findings to the Community Services Committee. Phase 2 of the Study will present preliminary findings and recommendations to the community for review and comment anticipated in winter/spring 2021.

To learn more, visit the Neighbourhood Traffic Management Guide webpage.

The City of Oshawa invites community members to provide input on a study to update the Neighbourhood Traffic Management Guide (N.T.M.G.). Traffic management is used to address speeding, volume and traffic safety concerns in neighbourhoods.

The updated N.T.M.G. will identify new processes for selecting the most appropriate management tools for residential streets in the City of Oshawa based on best practices from comparable cities and discuss the roles and justifications for using specific tools. The N.T.M.G. does not address traffic concerns on regional roads in Oshawa.

Have Your Say

Community members are invited to provide their feedback online by:

  • Visiting Connect Oshawa to view a virtual presentation and complete an online feedback form.
  • Community members who prefer to complete the feedback form on paper are asked to call Service Oshawa at 905-436-3311 during regular business hours.
  • Participants can also take part in a crowdsourcing map on Connect Oshawa, which will be used to collect location-specific information on traffic calming issues and concerns on City residential streets.

Key items being considered for inclusion in the updated N.T.M.G. are as follows:

  • a new process for reviewing and implementing Traffic Management in residential neighbourhoods;
  • a policy to determine where in the City Traffic Management should be prioritized;
  • best practices for designing safe roadways in new neighbourhoods;
  • a toolbox of traffic calming measures that can be utilized to improve traffic safety; and,
  • a policy for 40 km/h areas, and Community Safety Zones.

Feedback will be received until 4:00 p.m. on Friday, December 11, 2020 and will be considered in the development of preliminary findings to the Community Services Committee. Phase 2 of the Study will present preliminary findings and recommendations to the community for review and comment anticipated in winter/spring 2021.

To learn more, visit the Neighbourhood Traffic Management Guide webpage.

Have a question regarding the Neighbourhood Traffic Management Guide Study? Ask it here! We'll do our best to get back to you within two business days.

Questions and Answers

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    What is neighbourhood traffic management?

    20 days ago

    Neighbourhood traffic management (also referred to as traffic calming) is a term used to describe the actions taken to address speeding, excessive volume, and safety concerns on roads in our community. These actions can be implemented on a single street, or on a community-wide scale to alter driver behaviour. 

    Traffic management can be achieved through a combination of policies, regulations, and/or physical treatments to improve traffic conditions and increase safety for all road users in a specific area. Traffic management policy tools include lower speed limits, Community Safety Zones, and crossing guards. 

    Traffic management devices may include raised crosswalks, curb extensions, and speed humps. Traffic management devices can be implemented as temporary trials or permanent retrofits to existing roads. 

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    What is a Neighbourhood Traffic Management Guide?

    20 days ago

    A Neighbourhood Traffic Management Guide (N.T.M.G.) is a document that presents traffic management devices used to alter driver behaviour and the processes that govern their selection for implementation. Although the Guide is intended to assist City Council and Staff in responding to traffic issues throughout the City, it is focused on traffic management at the local community-level.

    Updating the N.T.M.G. will: 

    • revise the current processes to reflect the latest provincial policies and standards;
    • include low cost, quick to install treatments, such as in-road flexible signs and other devices for temporary traffic management trials;
    • assist City Transportation Staff and City Council with responding to traffic issues;
    • establish comprehensive and accountable traffic management device selection and scoring processes; and,
    • evaluate the usage of 40 km/h speed limit areas and Community Safety Zones in school zones and crossing guard locations.
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    Where can I find the current Neighbourhood Traffic Management Guide?

    20 days ago

    The current version of the Neighbourhood Traffic Management Guide (N.T.M.G.) is accessible via the website link, https://www.oshawa.ca/city-hall/resources/trafficman.pdf.

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    What do I do if I notice traffic issues along a road?

    20 days ago

    While this study is ongoing, traffic issues can be submitted via the N.T.M.G. study website feedback form and crowdsourced map on www.connectoshawa.com/TrafficGuide

    While the purpose of this study is not to address issues at specific locations, your submissions will be used to inform the development of the updated N.T.M.G. document.

    Issues can also be submitted to Service Oshawa using the various contact methods listed on https://www.oshawa.ca/city-hall/service-oshawa.asp.

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    Where has the City implemented traffic management policies and/or devices?

    20 days ago

    Under direction from City Council, all City roads directly adjacent to parks and school areas have their speed limits reduced to 40km/h. Specific roads and road sections with reduced speed limits can be found in the Oshawa Traffic By-laws, specifically Schedule 17 – Maximum Rate of Speed. 

    The Oshawa Traffic By-laws documents are available on https://www.oshawa.ca/residents/By-laws.asp 

    Community Safety Zones in Oshawa include: 

    • Conlin Road West and Conlin Road East between Founders Drive and Bridle Road; 
    • Rossland Road West near Monsignor Paul Dwyer Catholic High School;
    • Stevenson Road North near Adelaide McLaughlin Public School; 
    • Adelaide Avenue East and Harmony Road North near Eastdale Collegiate and Vincent Massey Public School; 
    • Ritson Road North near Beau Valley Public School; and, 
    • Simcoe Street North near St. Stephen’s United Church and SJ Phillips Public School.

    The City has various traffic management devices in place, including speed humps, curb extensions, roundabouts, mini-roundabouts, radar message boards, and reduced land widths with urban shoulder lane markings. Installed examples are listed below:

    • roundabouts at the Britannia Avenue West / Windfields Farm Drive West intersection, the Thornton Road North / Conlin Road intersection, and the Northern Dancer Drive / Bridle Road intersection;
    • mini roundabouts are at the Arborwood Drive / Salmers Drive intersection;
    • curb extensions are along Beatrice Street East, near the east limits and Glenbourne Drive;
    • speed humps are along Athol Street East near the intersection with Oshawa Boulevard South; and,
    • reduced lane widths are along Mary Street North and Somerville Street.
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    What is a Community Safety Zone?

    20 days ago

    A Community Safety Zone is a marked and designated portion of a roadway, where the community and municipality have determined that road safety is a concern. Community Safety Zones are recognized under the Provincial Highway Traffic Act, and allows for increased fines for speeding, distracted driving, and other such offences within these zones. 

    Under recent changes to the Provincial Highway Traffic Act, Community Safety Zones are also among the areas that are eligible for Automated Speed Enforcement. Community Safety Zones are often located in areas where higher numbers of seniors and school children walking or cycling are common.

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    What is a 40 km/h Speed Limit Area?

    20 days ago

    A 40 km/h speed limit area is a policy tool aimed at lowering speed limits across a neighbourhood or specific areas of a road network (e.g., around schools or parks). Signage is only needed at entry and exit points of these areas, minimizing the number of signs needed overall. 

    Amendments to the Ontario Highway Traffic Act in 2017 now allow municipalities to designate these areas by passing a by-law. Community petitions are not required. This Study will focus on the scoring process and selection criteria for establishing new 40 km/h speed limit areas.

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    What is the difference between a speed hump and speed cushion?

    20 days ago

    Both speed humps and speed cushions are intended to reduce speeds by creating a vertical deflection in the road, which require drivers to slow down to pass comfortably. Speed cushions; however, are designed to allow vehicles with larger wheel bases (e.g., fire trucks, transit vehicles) avoid the vertical deflection.

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    What is the difference between a roundabout and mini-roundabout?

    20 days ago

    Roundabouts and mini-roundabouts are circular intersections that function as traffic management devices when placed in a residential communities. 

    Roundabouts generally feature an unpassable physical central island (composed of concrete, street furniture, landscaping, etc.) and raised splitter islands on each intersection leg. 

    Mini-roundabouts often feature a mountable central island, which sometimes exists only as painted road markings. 

    A third form of circular intersection is a neighbourhood traffic calming circle, which is a hybrid of the above, often applied as a speed management retrofit.

    Installed examples are listed below:

    • roundabouts at the Britannia Avenue West / Windfields Farm Drive West intersection, the Thornton Road North / Conlin Road intersection, and the Northern Dancer Drive / Bridle Road intersection;
    • mini roundabouts are at the Arborwood Drive / Salmers Drive intersection;
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    What is the purpose of curb extensions?

    20 days ago

    Curb extensions are roadway narrowing treatments that can be applied at intersections or midblock locations. Curb extensions serve to reduce the pedestrian crossing distance and the associated road crossing exposure. When applied at intersections, curb extensions also reduce a driver’s turning radius, slowing turning speeds. At midblock locations, curb extensions reduce the roadway width, which has shown to slow vehicle operating speeds, particularly when two-way traffic is present. Where lanes are wider than minimum standard lane widths set by the City of Oshawa and Durham Region, curb extensions may be considered as a traffic management treatment.